Published On: Thu, Aug 18th, 2016

Zika in Miami was ‘just a matter of time’

The first localized cases of Zika virus in the United States were reported in Miami, Florida, on July 29, 2016.

Because the virus has been linked to microcephaly—babies born with small heads and neurological deficits—and to other syndromes like Guillain-Barré (a disorder where the body’s immune system attacks the nerves, leading often to temporary paralysis), the outbreak led the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to issue an unusual—and some say unprecedented—travel alert advising pregnant women not to travel to Miami’s Wynwood neighborhood, where the virus was found.

Estimated range of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes
Estimated range of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, which transmit Zika virus. (Credit: CDC)

David Hamer, professor of global health at Boston University School of Public Health, a School of Medicine professor of medicine, and principal investigator for the global infectious disease surveillance network GeoSentinel, has been tracking the current Zika outbreak from its earliest days.


This text is published here under a Creative Commons License.
Author: Barbara Moran-Boston University
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