Cleaning your bathroom or kitchen worktop is a necessary endeavour, preferably done every day. If you want to make sure that your worktop has a longer lifespan and will look as good as – or even better than – new even after a few years of use, you need to clean it and keep it maintained. But when it comes to granite worktops (and other natural stone worktops), there is a particular way of cleaning them that will guarantee their shiny and beautiful finish for a long time.

Cleaning setDos and don’ts

When you have granite worktops or other natural stone worktops, you have to make sure that you don’t use any abrasive cleaners on them. Cleaners that contain ingredients like vinegar, lemon, bleach, ammonia, and lime should always be avoided, as these can strip away the shine of the granite’s surface and make it look faded and dull after some time. Also, these types of cleaners can damage the sealant on the worktop’s surface and even contribute to the absorption of stains.

Do use a clean cloth on your worktop. A microfibre cloth is a good choice. A mild and gentle dishwashing liquid or detergent will do a good job as well.

How to effectively clean your granite worktop

Fill a bucket with warm water and add a few drops of the dishwashing liquid or detergent to it. Mix it so that suds can form. Afterwards, wet your cloth with the mixture and then thoroughly wipe the surface of the worktop. Use another piece of microfibre cloth and wet it with warm water so you can wipe off the soap mixture from the surface. If the worktop still shows signs of dullness or streaks, the soap mixture may not have been rinsed completely, so wipe it again. You can either let your worktop air dry or wipe it with another piece of dry microfibre cloth.

How to effectively remove stains from your granite worktop

Although staining will not be a common occurrence with a granite worktop that has been correctly sealed, it can happen if your worktop has (a) not been sealed or (b) needs a new application of sealant.

If there is a stain on your granite worktop, you should try to remove it as soon as possible so it does not become absorbed. The stain should be blotted rather than wiped or rubbed to prevent it from spreading even further. But to effectively remove a more stubborn stain, you need a whiting powder (or calcium carbonate powder, often available at DIY and hardware shops), water, hydrogen peroxide, tape, plastic film or wrap, a small bowl, a sponge, and a clean microfibre cloth.

Make a poultice from the whiting powder and hydrogen peroxide in the small bowl. The poultice should be thick and have a putty-like consistency. The poultice should then be applied to the stained surface area. Be mindful of keeping the poultice only on the stained surface and not on areas which are not affected. The paste should have a thickness of around ¼ of an inch. Cover the stained area with the plastic film or wrap, and use the tape to hold down the edges. This should be left until the paste is dry, which can take as long as two days. When the paste is thoroughly dry, wipe it away using the sponge or microfibre cloth. Rinse the area with clean and warm water. If there is still evidence of the stain, you can repeat the process several times until you can no longer see any sign of the stain.

Granite countertop