If you live in an oast cowl home, you’ll likely at some point want to restore your oast cowl to its former glory – after all, the majority of oast cowl homes are pretty old, and they just don’t make them like that anymore. If you are considering carrying out a restoration project on your oast cowl it can be pretty tricky if you’re not sure where to start. Thankfully, we’ve put together a number of steps that can help you understand what happens when you use the services of an oast cowl restoration company such as Dude & Arnette.

Oast Cowl Home
Photo by Loco Steve

No-Obligation Visit

Before you decide what to do about your oast cowl restoration, it’s a good idea to book some no-obligation visits with different companies in order to get an idea of the amount of work that will need to be carried out, how long it will take, and how much on average it will cost. Any good oast cowl restoration businesses will be happy to visit first, and many will even recommend it so that they get to have a look at the oast cowl first and make sure that the work is something they’d be able to take on.

Removing the Cowl

Once you have the restoration all booked and planned, the next step is removing the cowl. This will be done using either scaffolding or a crane depending on your access, and typically won’t take longer than an hour, so it’s quick and hassle free. A good company should also always cap the building in an appropriate manner in order to protect your home against the weather and any nesting wildlife.

Refurbishment

Once the company has removed the cowl, they will most likely take it back to a workshop where refurbishment will take place. Generally, they will begin by sanding the layers of old paint, and removing any moisture from the wood before they begin the restoration work. Depending on the condition of the cowl, restoration could include a number of different processes, including replacing boards and heads, and repairing the main frame or curb. During this process the cut timber should also be re-treated in order to ensure that it is weatherproof.

Paintwork

Once work on the restoration of the wood has been completed, it’s time to restore the paintwork to its former glory as well. Although most homeowners prefer a traditional white finish, speak to the company if you’re thinking of a different colour to make your home stand out – it’s usually not a problem. A good company will give your cowl five coats of paint for optimum appearance and weatherproofing, and should also use a primer. Once work has been completed, your oast cowl will be replaced – a good company should be able to do this with minimum fuss.

Do you live in an oast cowl home? Have you ever carried out restoration work on your oast cowl? Whether you hired a company or even did it yourself, we’d love to hear from you in the comments.