What’s bao, we hear you ask. If you’re looking for the latest food trend to hit taste buds, you’re going to want to know the answer. Bao, also known as baozi, is a type of steamed bun that can be filled with all kinds of delicious ingredients. The Asian street food star is coming to a restaurant in the UK near you – here’s what you need to know about bao.

Bao

1. Bao is Made from Steamed Bread

The process used to make the bao bread is what makes this sandwich stand out from the rest. Instead of baking the dough, you steam the yeast. The texture of the bread is therefore light, smooth, and very fluffy, resulting in a very different taste to your regular sandwich roll. The steamed bread also has a good content of sugar, so it is sweeter than your average sandwich.

2. Bao is Great for Breakfast

The bao sandwich is a popular street food and is often served as a breakfast for people on the go in China and Vietnam. This highly portable snack food is also ideal as a quick snack in the afternoon or as a more substantial evening meal.

3. In Hawaii, Bao is Manapua

Bao is an Asian trademark but there are versions of the steamed bread dish all over the world, including in Hawaii, where the word means pastry or cake. The delicacy in Hawaii comes with pork and a selection of vegetables.

4. Bao is Also Vegetarian-Friendly

The most common way to eat a bao sandwich, for example those served at vieteat.co.uk, is with a filling of pork or a traditional beef burger. But you can also fill the bun with a mixture of azuki beans, boiled and served with sweet honey and sugar.

Bao making5. Bao is One of Hundreds of Different Vietnamese Dishes to Try

If you try a fresh bao or bun sandwich and get the taste for the type of Vietnamese food served at vieteat.co.uk, you have a range of different options to try. Start with the ubiquitous pho, a dish made from steamed beef bones that is transformed into a delicious broth with herbs and vegetables. Or the tasty treat called bahn mi – a Vietnamese take on the baguette, with the bread filled with cuts of meat and meat pate, plus Vietnamese herbs and spices, and a dollop of mayonnaise or chilli sauce. Look out for xoi, which is a Vietnamese staple – sticky rice that can be sweet or savoury in style. And don’t forget the Vietnamese spring rolls. These rolls are constructed out of gossamer-thin rice paper and filled with finely chopped shrimp and pork, vegetables, and herbs. Wash the whole meal down with some strong Vietnamese coffee and a sweet dessert made from bean paste and fruit. Make sure your next dish is a Vietnamese dish – you won’t be disappointed by the flavour and the variety on offer.