Hot air, being less dense than cold air, forces airplanes to move faster to gain speed to be able to rise. The problem is that airports do not have long enough lanes.

Last June, the US airport in Phoenix was forced to cancel several of its flights that were scheduled for the central hours of the day due to the high temperatures recorded at the aerodrome.

A study by Columbia University warns that rising temperatures in the world due to climate change could change flight schedules and have more air movement at night than day.

In fact, in countries of the Middle East, where temperatures are high, there are usually night take-off schedules so the aircraft can reach a higher speed because of the drop in temperatures at that time.

The hot air, being less dense than the cold air, forces the airplanes to move faster to acquire speed and to be able to rise. The problem is that airports do not have long enough lanes to reach the necessary speed. Therefore, during the hottest parts of the day, up to 30% of aircraft could have to reduce their fuel load or reduce the number of passengers to fly. Another of the measures would be the aforementioned, fly at night.