Interesting research from the team at www.sunshine.co.uk has revealed that most parents believe that children under 5-years-old are too young to venture on holiday abroad.
The UK online travel agent quizzed no fewer than 2,895 adults who all had a child that was at least 8-years-old. Furthermore, each and every correspondent had been a frequent traveller before their new parenthood status.
The survey first asked how long it took parents to take a holiday following the birth of their child. The average answer, across all results, was five years.

Then, when the study delved into the reasons why holidays were delayed following the birth, it became clear that a lot of people just didn’t think that travelling with very young children was appropriate. 43% suggested that the main reason they didn’t go to a foreign country was because their little one was too young and as such, they opted to stay in local resorts in the UK.

Travel abroad with kids

These results contradict the state of the industry according to the Managing Director of sunshine.co.uk, Chris Clarkson. He said that there are now plenty of options for new parents:
“Many parents think it’s not always feasible to go away on holiday when there’s a new-born on the scene, but that doesn’t have to be so. There are plenty of hotels that cater excellently for families with young children and babies, from self-catering apartments to 5* hotels, so as long as you do your research then you can easily find somewhere to suit your needs.
“There’s nothing to say having a baby should stop you going on holiday; when you feel comfortable leaving the child for a short period of time, you can always look into mini-breaks in short-haul destinations to have a well-deserved breather!”

Nevertheless, there were further reasons why parents opted to avoid the temptation of jetting away to an exotic country. For example, 61% said that they just didn’t feel it was appropriate to leave their child at such a young age. 36% proceeded to say that they just couldn’t afford to buy a holiday due to the financial burden of children, while a respective 12% and 17% said that time restraints and having no care options meant that a holiday was out of the question.

Even though there were so many reasons why parents said that they could not go on holiday, many of them actually wanted a short break from reality. This was represented through the answers to the question which asked ‘How soon after the birth of your youngest child did you feel like you needed a holiday/break away from the child?’. Here, it was found that 82% felt they needed a break from being a parent within just three months of their child’s birth.

There were some surprising results from other parts of the survey as well. For example, 1/10 of respondents said that they hadn’t been on holiday since the birth of their youngest child – even though every single participant had children who were at least 8 years of age. In other words, they had not been out of the country in at least eight years.

It was also interesting to see just how many parents opted to go away without their little ones. Just over half of respondents fell into this group, with 52% saying that they opted for a break after leaving their children with someone else. This ‘someone else’ was usually the grandparents, with 72% saying that this is who they left their child with when they did venture away without them.