Being a caregiver can be a hard and thankless job. However, if you’re taking care of someone because they were hurt at work or otherwise personally injured and are unable to resume their normal profession, your job may have just gotten even harder. For someone who’s used to going to work and putting in a full day’s labor, being laid up due to injury can be extremely hard to handle. So to help make things easier on both of you, here are three tips for caring for a loved one who can’t work due to injury.

Discuss Physical and Emotional Needs

Once it’s determined that your loved one will have to stop working for a period of time, F. Diane Barth, a contributor to Psychology Today, recommends that you both sit down together and have a discussion about both of your physical and emotional needs. Because this is going to be a change for both of you, it’s important that you start this part of your relationship out with openness and candor. Your loved one may want their care done in a certain way while you may want to voice your feelings about having to be their caregiver and what your expectations are. By getting everything out in the open from the beginning, you’ll be better able to meet challenges that come together in the future.

Take Care When Lifting

If you’ll have to take a more physical role in your loved one’s care, you’ll want to learn the best ways to serve them while also taking care of your own body. Especially when it comes to lifting them, it’s vital that you use the proper form and technique so you don’t get hurt yourself. According to AgingCare.com, you always want to make sure that your feet are stable, you’re as close to the person as possible, and that you use your legs to lift rather than your back. By doing these things, you’ll be able to move your loved one without causing undue pain or stress to your own body due to the heavy lifting.

Reassure Their Worth

Especially if your loved one is used to working a lot and being a financial provider, he or she might have a lot of trouble seeing their own worth while they’re at home and injured. To help them gain a healthy perspective during this trying time, Scott Muska, a contributor to NBC News, recommends reminding them that their healing process is a productive and helpful thing they’re doing for themselves and their family. While this might not boost their spirits completely, hopefully it will at least relieve some of the guilt they might be feeling.

If you’re taking care of a newly injured loved one, consider using the tips mentioned above to help make this an easier time on everyone involved.

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