We are running out of insects, as suggested by a meta-analysis which concludes that we are losing almost 1% of the population year after year. A quarter of all insects on Earth have been lost in the last three decades. This is not the first time scientists have warned. And this could be a major problem for biodiversity and the functioning of the planet.

The mataanalysis has been published in Science and collects published data on more than 10,000 insect species from a total of 1,676 locations around the planet thanks to 166 studies. It is the largest and most comprehensive meta-analysis to date. By analyzing this information, researchers have seen how we are losing insects at a rate of 1% per year, although with many variations according to the area of the planet.

It is not all bad news, although there is a drastic reduction in the number of insects, studies published so far also reveal an increase in the population of freshwater insects (flies, mosquitoes, dragonflies…). They are actually increasing faster than insects that die on land, experts believe this is because rivers and streams are cleaner than they were decades ago.
In spite of this, the amount of insects in water is much lower than the amount of insects on land. They represent only 10% of insect species and do not help the ecosystem as much because they do not pollinate.

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