The congestion situation remains in the Suez Canal due to the macro bottleneck produced after the container ship ‘Ever Given’ ran aground more than a week ago and was released last Tuesday. About 250 ships are trying to cross the canal unsuccessfully due to the constant accumulation of ships without the bottleneck being released. 249 vessels were still waiting their turn on Thursday to cross this important waterway, through which 10% of the world’s maritime trade and 25% of containers pass.

This Thursday, 87 ships were scheduled to cross the canal, a similar number to the previous day.

The head of the Suez Canal Authority, which manages the waterway, Admiral Osama Rabie, said Wednesday night in an interview with an Egyptian television station that so far nearly 200 of the 422 vessels that were waiting when the “Ever Given” was finally disentangled on Monday evening had crossed the passage.

On that day Rabie had said he hoped to restore normal shipping in “three to three and a half days,” although on Wednesday night he extended the deadline to Friday or Saturday.

Maersk, the main shipping line operating in Suez, had estimated that the logjam could take “six days or more” to thin out.

Meanwhile, other maritime logistics companies warn that the backlogs could be replicated at the European ports of destination for these vessels, as they lack the storage capacity to handle the simultaneous arrival of these ships.

Rabie also announced the start of the investigation into what happened to the “Ever Given” to determine responsibility for the incident.

And he estimated that the compensation for the canal could reach 1 billion dollars (about 850 million euros), although he had initially said that the losses had been between 12 and 15 million (between 10 and 12.8 million euros) per day.

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