There were many who thought in 2011 that the death of Muammar Gaddafi would lead to a process of democratic reconstruction in Libya, which, despite the hopes, has not yet become a reality.

On October 20, 2011, after the end of the Libyan War, and the intervention of NATO, Gaddafi tried to flee the country, but was captured and tortured to death by the rebels in the city of Sirte. His body was buried in an unknown place in the desert so that no one could come to pay homage to him.

Ten years after the death of a man who was considered a dictator by most of the international community, Libya is still not rebuilt. Without Gaddafi, without exits and without a project for the country.

The Libyan government that currently remains in power in a process of transition is incapable of dealing with the human, social and economic problems that plague the country, and which are becoming more and more acute.

A decade after Qaddafi’s assassination, there remains only the hope that someone will remember the many problems that plague Libya and whose solutions are still not forthcoming.

A new Gaddafi ruling Libya?

On December 24, Libya will hold its first elections in seven years, considered a kind of plebiscite to try to quell the violence, disorder and poverty that plague each and every part of the country.

Nevertheless, the figure of Gaddafi still remains nostalgic for many Libyans, who could support his son Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, who will run in the next election to govern Libya.

He already assured in an interview to The New York Times in July that he might run in the elections, a statement he finally made official in September; thus, the Qaddafi name could still return to Libya a decade after the last one’s death.

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