As quickly as it formed, it also closed. The hole in the ozone layer over the Arctic has marked historical figures over the last few months, creating an unprecedented hole in the northern hemisphere. But now researchers say it has closed, restoring ozone levels to this part of the Earth. The Arctic, at times, is recovering.

A few weeks ago, NASA published a worrying image showing the drastic change in the level of ozone in the Arctic between 2019 and 2020. This brutal drop in ozone concentration was due to the fact that the coldest winter in recent decades was also recorded at the North Pole, which led to clouds formed at high altitude destroying the ozone by the pollutants they carried. This process is similar to that which occurs in Antarctica, where the hole in the ozone layer has been permanent for decades (although fortunately we are closing it).

The one that seems to have closed is already the one at the North Pole. According to data from CAMS (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service), the polar vortex has broken in recent days allowing hot air to enter. The polar vortex was causing an accumulation of cold air to generate low temperatures and thus the process of ozone destruction. With the rupture of the polar vortex, hot air has entered the area increasing temperatures, dissolving clouds and allowing the ozone to recover its normal concentration levels in the stratosphere.

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