It has happened again, we have once again broken the record for the hottest month on record on the planet. Last July the planet recorded the highest average temperature on record, the highest in the last 142 years, since global and regular records have been kept.

As reported by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), July was the hottest month ever on Earth. Despite the pandemic in 2020 and the resulting global industrial and logistical standstill, the effects of climate change have continued to be felt. 2021 is also set to be one of the hottest years on record.

Combined global land and ocean surface temperatures were 0.93 degrees Celsius above the 20th century average. In total, the average temperature was 16.73 degrees Celsius.

16.73 °C may seem like a considerably pleasant temperature and not at all compared to temperatures on a sunny day in the middle of a heatwave. However, it should be borne in mind that these are average temperatures, which also take into account frozen water at the poles or winter temperatures in the southern hemisphere, for example.

Specific regions of the Earth also set their own heat records. For example, Asia recorded the hottest July on record, while Europe had the second hottest July in its history. Other continents also made it into their top 10.
“Human beings have unequivocally influenced global warming”: the IPCC’s exhaustive report on climate change is so conclusive.

This time last year we also saw the record of the highest temperature ever recorded on the planet. By contrast, in Spain we broke the record for the lowest temperatures at the beginning of this year. Although in the end so many records are being broken that “it is impossible to keep track”.

What was the previous record? Also July, in 2016. Specifically the temperature was 16.72 °C average. Effectively 0.01 °C lower. An average temperature that, interestingly, was also recorded in 2019 and 2020.

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