We have a new record for calculating decimals of pi: 62 trillion decimals. According to the DAViS department of the FHGR (Grisons University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland), it beats the previous world record, which was held by Google researchers and was about 50 trillion. The exact number of decimals calculated is 62,831,853,071,796, the last of which is …7817924264, very much a “Trivia question”.

It took about 108 days to calculate all these decimals: 92 days to calculate the hexadecimal version provided by the algorithm and the rest to convert to decimal. Another three to four weeks are needed to verify it, and they are still working on it, although no problems are foreseen. The “compressed” number in hexadecimal requires about 24 TB but about twice as much (48 TB) if converted to decimal. To carry out the task they used the Y-cruncher software (by Alexander Yee) whose algorithm is the famous Chudnovsky algorithm combined with the inverse square root.

The hardware used are two AMD EPYC 7542 CPUs with 32 cores each, 1 TB of RAM, the operating system on an SSD drive and a separate 510 TB of disk storage space: 38 drives of about 16 TB each. Of this assembly, 34 drives are used as swap (computational and swap space) and another 4 drives for the final result. The entire equipment consumes a total of around 1,700 W of power; by comparison, a hairdryer consumes around 800 W.

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