Every year thousands of Brits emigrate to sunnier climes, and whilst jobs in Spain are harder to come by than in the past, the fall in house prices and a lower cost of living than the UK mean that if you’re able to secure long term employment, a new life in Spain is a realistic prospect.

The Authentic Spanish Experience

When most people imagine Spain, their mind wanders across a land of flamenco dancers, bullfights and arid, sunny vistas, full of ancient architecture and Moorish castles.

Andalucia is definitely Spain’s most “Spanish” region in the eyes of foreigners. Consequently, it’s also the most visited. This large and diverse area has a population of eight million inhabitants, spanning quaint villages, overdeveloped resorts and a wealth of scenery that changes from coastal to mountainous.

Choosing A Place To Settle:

There’s a huge variety of locations to choose from if you’re thinking of relocating to Andalucia. It’s important to do your research and work out what kind of lifestyle you’d like to lead, and what kind of career prospects you’ll encounter once you arrive. The requirements of 20 something gap-year student are radically different to those of a professional couple with a new family. Here’s some of the most popular destinations to get you thinking:

Major Cities

Seville is Andalucia’s capital. It’s a fantastic place to start, and whilst it doesn’t have Barcelona’s cosmopolitan, dynamic feel, it’s also much smaller and arguably more charming. There’s a wealth of Medieval architecture and the city’s Moorish and Roman heritage is clear to see. The city is vibrant, safe and fun, and whilst it doesn’t have the outright pace and hedonism of Barcelona, it’s fun, cultured and liveable, with fantastic food and a great nightlife scene.

Granada

If you’re looking for exotic architecture and evidence of Spain’s arabic history, then make a beeline for Granada. The Alhambra Palace is a magnificent sight to behold, with its Islamic architecture and fabulous gardens. Granada, and nearby Cordoba are famous for their food. Both offer fantastic tapas restaurants, and the nearby hillside towns are picturesque destinations for weekend excursions.

Superb Spanish Beaches

Everyone is familiar with Spain’s overdeveloped resort towns along the Costa Del Sol, but Andalucia’s coast offers so much more. The Costa De La Luz is mostly government protected, and as a consequence there is little development. It’s possible to avoid the popular tourist traps here, and indulge in some windsurfing or swimming, all with the backdrop of Moroccan mountains on the horizon. As well as the picturesque Tarifa, other smaller towns like Barbate and Conil de la Frontera offer a slower and more traditional pace of life to the hectic tourist orientated resorts.

The Costa Del Sol

If you’re a younger expat who enjoys sampling local nightlife, or you simply depend on the tourist industry for work, you’re much more likely to prefer the Costa Del Sol as a base to explore the region. Malaga’s busy airport is the gateway to this coast, and although it’s a very busy and touristy area, it’s still possible to sample the history and culture of this coastline in the less developed western towns and mountainous regions like the Serranía de Ronda.

Spain might have its share of economic woes, but if you can find an employment opportunity in Spain, sunny Andalucia could end up being the new home you’ve always dreamt of.

By Harry Price

Harry Price is a successful author and professional traveller. He enjoys the flexibility that entrepreneurship offers and frequently moves to different countries.

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